Wednesday, April 26th, 2017

Going Pro #3 – Finding a Trainer That Fits

Published on November 15, 2014 by   ·   No Comments

The process of learning a skill, or group of skills, is fairly universal – essentially it comes down to instruction, practice, evaluation, and repetition. Practice and replication are down to you – how hard you push yourself and how much hard work you put in. Training twice per day and pushing yourself hard during training is great, but it’s not the one thing you need in order to improve. To complement your own dedication, you need instruction and evaluation. In short, you need a coach who shares your dedication and can teach you brand new skills, help you improve what you have got, and more importantly they can expose your own weaknesses and help you eliminate all of them. The process of finding a coach is fairly basic; the process of finding a coach that can really help you , well… that’s not so easy.

We started playing sepaktakraw in Australia where the sport is virtually unfamiliar and coaching was simply not accessible. The first time we trained with a trainer was in Bangkok when we joined a local high-school team for their training sessions. During the time, we thought that our experience there was typical of what we could anticipate from any coach. There was a few structure to the training, there were exercises and match practice, and there was a group of 20 young players most of trying to improve together. What more could we ask for?

We’ve since moved on and have trained to teams and coaches, and on the way we’ve learnt that one of the most, if not the most important thing about coaching, may be the quality of the relationship you have using the coach. You will have the best coaching and training experience if your coach is personally invested in seeing you improve; if they truly want the best for you. When the coach wants to see you improve they will listen to your goals and provide the courses environment and structure to get you presently there. That doesn’t mean a trainer has to be your friend; if something they’re more like your boss and they also expect you to do your job – and your job description reads: ‘train hard and become a sepaktakraw legend’.

That’s not to say the particular coaching we received in Bangkok was bad, it was still a fantastic step up from having no trainer, but for whatever reason the relationship with that trainer just didn’t develop – this individual wasn’t invested in our progress, therefore our training wasn’t as focused and as beneficial as it could have been.

So how do you find a trainer that works with you? The old fashioned method – word of mouth and trial and error peppered with perseverance! If you’re lucky enough to reside somewhere sepaktakraw is established, the fastest way to improve is to ask to participate a local clubs training session. If you can find no local clubs, ask around in local courts or visit locations you know good players train in and just ask. You may have to try several different coaches before you find someone in whose personality and coaching style line-up with your own goals in such a way that it just works. Regardless, you need to remember that coaching is a two-way road ; you can’t expect a trainer (or more experienced player! ) to invest time helping you if you don’t help all of them in return as well as prove your worth to them early.


Alex’s experience with the Ratchaburi Takraw Club

When I first joined with the Ratchaburi Takraw Club for the 2014 Takraw Thai League (TTL) season, We knew straight away that I was the least skilled player there, by far. We knew that I had nothing to offer the team or the coaches in terms of downright skill, so I had to prove me personally by trying to be the most diligent player there.

We woke up first in the morning, We never skipped a training session (except the few I missed after i got sick! ), and when I used to be at training I never ceased – I would try to always be practicing something. After a couple of weeks the head trainer realised I wasn’t just presently there for fun, and it wasn’t a holiday for me. He saw that I was devoted to improving, and that was when this individual took an interest in me and became invested in my sepaktakraw future. He began spending more time coaching me, and every day after the morning and afternoon TTL training session, he would take me to train with a youth ladies team because I needed to improve my basic skills. He did not need to spend this time and hard work on me, and you can bet merely didn’t prove myself to him first, he wouldn’t have bothered.

When analyzing different coaches, you should also keep the subsequent in mind:

  • A good coach will be able to explain the reason behind why you need to do a drill in a particular method, or how an aspect of your game could be improved.
  • Try and look for a coach appropriate to your level of ability – if you’re still struggling with the basics then you probably don’t need a nationwide level coach!
  • Try out everything the coach tells you. All of us have a different style, even coaches, and also you never know if a new technique will work until you try it.
  • Give each and every coach fully of your attention and effort, to show them that you’re worthy of their time.
  • If you feel like the coaching you’re getting isn’t quite right or could be better, don’t be afraid to try another coach!
  • Coaching will go beyond one-on-one tuition, you need to furthermore consider the atmosphere and environment the particular coach creates – what mindset towards training and improvement the actual other players have?
  • Set your own short-term and long lasting goals, and tell your prospective trainer what these are so that you can work on all of them together.

Exactly what each person requires from a coach will be different; what you require personally will develop and change as your skills improve and your goals shift. We’ve always attempted to challenge ourselves by surrounding ourselves with players and coaches with higher skill levels than our personal, and we’d recommend this to everyone. If you’re the best sepaktakraw participant on the court, it’s time to look for a new court – and a trainer to go with it!

Written by Alex Newman and Daniel Ellen-Barwell of Takrawesome

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service — if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters. org/content-only/faq. php#publishers.

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The process of learning a skill, or set of skills, is fairly universal – essentially it comes down to instructions, practice, analysis, and repetition. Practice and repetition are down to you – how hard you push yourself and how much effort you put in. Coaching twice a day and pushing yourself hard during training is great, but it’s not the only thing you need in order to improve. To complement your dedication, you need instructions and analysis. In short, you need a trainer who shares your dedication and may teach you new skills, help you improve what you have, and more importantly they could expose your weaknesses and help you eliminate them. The process of finding a trainer is fairly simple; the process of finding a trainer that can really help you , well… that’s not so easy.

We started actively playing sepaktakraw in Australia where the sport is virtually unknown and coaching had been simply not available. The first time we skilled with a coach was in Bangkok when we joined a local high-school team for his or her training sessions. At the time, we thought that our experience there was typical of what we should could expect from any trainer. There was some structure to the education, there were drills and match practice, and there was a group of 20 youthful players all trying to improve collectively. What more could we ask for?

We’ve since moved on and also have trained with other teams and coaches, and along the way we’ve learnt that certain of the most, if not the particular most important thing about coaching, is the quality of the connection you have with the coach. You will have the very best coaching and training experience in case your coach is personally invested in viewing you improve; if they truly want the very best for you. If the coach wants to help you improve they will listen to your targets and provide the training environment and structure to get you there. That doesn’t imply a coach has to be your friend; if anything they’re more like your own boss and they expect you to perform your job – and your job description reads: ‘train hard and become the sepaktakraw legend’.

That is not to say the coaching we obtained in Bangkok was bad, it had been still an amazing step up from having no coach, but for whatever reason the relationship with that coach just didn’t develop – he wasn’t invested in our progress, so our training wasn’t as targeted and as beneficial since it could have been.

So how do you find a coach that works with you? The old fashioned way – word of mouth and trial and error peppered with perseverance! If you’re lucky enough to live somewhere sepaktakraw is established, the quickest way to improve is to ask to join a local clubs workout. If there are no local clubs, ask around at local courts or even visit places you know good players train at and just ask. You might have to try several different coaches before you find someone whose personality and training style align with your own goals in a way that it just works. Regardless, you should remember that coaching is really a two-way street ; you can’t anticipate a coach (or more experienced participant! ) to spend time helping you unless you help them in return as well as show your worth to them early.


Alex’s experience of the Ratchaburi Takraw Club

When I first became a member of with the Ratchaburi Takraw Club for that 2014 Takraw Thai League (TTL) season, I knew straight away which i was the least skilled player presently there, by far. I knew that I got nothing to offer the team or the coaches in terms of outright skill, so I had to prove myself by trying to be the most diligent player there.

I woke up first in the morning, I never skipped an exercise session (except the few We missed when I got sick! ), and when I was at training We never stopped – I would try to always be practicing something. After a little while the head coach realised I wasn’t just there for fun, and it wasn’t a holiday for me. He saw which i was committed to improving, and that had been when he took an interest within me and became invested in the sepaktakraw future. He began spending more time coaching me, and every day following the morning and afternoon TTL workout, he would take me to train with a youth girls team because We needed to improve my basic skills. He didn’t need to spend this time and effort on me, and you may bet if I didn’t prove me personally to him first, he wouldn’t have bothered.

When evaluating different coaches, you should also keep the following in mind:

  • A good coach will be able to explain the reason behind why you need to do a drill within a particular way, or how an aspect of the game could be improved.
  • Try and find a coach appropriate to your level of skill – if you’re still struggling with the basics then you probably do not need a national level coach!
  • Try everything the trainer tells you. Everyone has a different style, actually coaches, and you never know if a brand new technique will work until you try it.
  • Give each and every coach 100% of the attention and effort, to show all of them that you’re worthy of their period.
  • If you feel like the training you’re receiving isn’t quite correct or could be better, don’t be scared to try another coach!
  • Coaching goes beyond one-on-one expenses, you need to also consider the atmosphere and environment the coach creates – what attitude towards training and improvement do the other players have got?
  • Set your own short-term and long-term goals, and tell your prospective coach what these are so that you can work on them together.

What each person requires from the coach will be different; what you require individually will evolve and change as your skills improve and your goals shift. We’ve always tried to challenge ourselves simply by surrounding ourselves with players and coaches with higher skill ranges than our own, and we’d suggest this to everyone. If you’re the very best sepaktakraw player on the court, it is time to find a new court – and a coach to go with it!

Written by Alex Newman and Daniel Ellen-Barwell associated with Takrawesome

This entry passed through the Full-Text REALLY SIMPLY SYNDICATION service – if this is your content material and you’re reading it upon someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters. org/content-only/faq. php#publishers.

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