Monday, May 29th, 2017

Heading Pro #5 – Targeted Exercising

Published on November 29, 2014 by   ·   No Comments

With a coach guiding you and several match experience under your belt there is no doubt a few flaws in your game will have reared their head. Maybe you struggle to receive drop serves, or can’t spike balls when the established is high and from deep in the court. You now have the bittersweet challenge of fixing these openings in your game. Bittersweet because on the one hand it no doubt feels like a step in reverse – repeating more ‘basic’ teaching, but the sweet side is as you eliminate these issues from your game you will become feared on the sepaktakraw courtroom!

So how do you teach to fix a weakness?

First you must clearly identify the problem before you correct it. It’s not enough to state “oh sometimes I just can’t spike the ball cleanly even when the set is good”, you have to know why you can not. In this example, there’s a good chance it’s to do with the set – is it higher than usual, are you needing to cover a lot of court to get to the ball, are you rushed, is your time wrong? There are so many little things that may have a drastic effect on your game. This is where a coach and/or an experienced player is going to be invaluable – they’ll be able to provide you with an external perspective on your movement and actions and be able to highlight where the issue lies. If you don’t have access to this quality of feedback, the next best thing is to film yourself and analyse it as best you can.

With the problem identified you need to start the challenging and somewhat frustrating part – practicing this problem scenario until it’s no longer a weakness . Let us assume that the problem scenario has been identified as a spiker who spikes well until the basketball is set higher than they are accustomed to. This can be a rather simple, yet common scenario. To get comfortable spiking high sets, the spiker must practice spiking tennis balls outside of their comfort height. To start with, spiking balls that are only slightly higher than a ‘perfect’ set to them, then once that’s comfortable, slightly higher again, and again, and so forth Until the spiker is nonplussed by height of the ball, and just views the high set as a valid and good set.

It’s not enough to practice what you already are good at – you must venture outside of your comfort zone and drill the items you find difficult.

Put generally this could be considered a three part approach to any ability:

  1. Identify the problem by testing and analysing the gamer in a given scenario
  2. Drill the scenario. Start easy and ramp up the difficulty as you improve
  3. Re-test the player in the first scenario

By applying this approach systematically to any faults or weaknesses in your game you will be a much stronger player, and you will improve much faster than if you continually shrug the weakness off as a mistake or anomaly. But it’s not easy! It will take a lot of hard work and determination in order to convert weaknesses to strengths – but that’s what Going Pro is all about!

Thanks to Ratchaburi Takraw Club for the use of the banner picture

Written by Daniel Ellen-Barwell of Takrawesome

This entry that passes the Full-Text RSS service — if this is your content and most likely reading it on someone else’s web site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters. org/content-only/faq. php#publishers.

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With a coach guiding you and some match up experience under your belt there’s without a doubt a few flaws in your game will have reared their head. Perhaps you find it difficult to receive drop serves, or can not spike balls when the set is high and from deep in the court. You now have the bittersweet problem of fixing these holes in your game. Bittersweet because on the one hand it no doubt feels like a step backwards – repeating more ‘basic’ training, however the sweet side is as you eliminate these issues from your game you’ll become feared on the sepaktakraw court!

So how do you train to solve a weakness?

Very first you must clearly recognize the problem before you can proper it. It’s not enough to say “oh sometimes I just can’t spike the ball cleanly even when the established is good”, you have to know why you can’t. In this particular example, there’s a good chance it’s to do with the set – is it higher than usual, are you having to cover a lot of court to get to the basketball, are you rushed, is your timing wrong? There are so many little things that can have a extreme effect on your game. This is where a coach and/or an experienced player will be invaluable – they’ll be able to give you an external perspective on your movement and actions and be able to highlight where the issue lies. If you don’t have access to this quality of feedback, the next best thing is to movie yourself and analyse it the best way you can.

With the issue identified you need to start the challenging and somewhat frustrating part – practicing this problem scenario until it’s no longer a weakness . Let us assume that the problem scenario has been identified as a spiker which spikes well until the ball is set higher than they are accustomed to. This is a rather simple, yet common scenario. To become comfy spiking high sets, the spiker must practice spiking balls outside of their comfort height. To start with, spiking balls that are only slightly more than a ‘perfect’ set for them, after that once that’s comfortable, slightly increased again, and again, etc . Until the spiker is nonplussed by the height of the ball, and just sees benefit set as a valid and great set.

It isn’t really enough to practice what you are already proficient at – you must venture outside of your own comfort zone and drill the things you discover difficult.

Put generally this could be considered a three part approach to any skill:

  1. Identify the problem simply by testing and analysing the player in a given scenario
  2. Drill down the scenario. Start easy and increase the difficulty as you improve
  3. Re-test the player in the original scenario

By applying this approach systematically to any faults or weaknesses in your game you will become a stronger player, and you will improve much quicker than if you continually shrug the weakness off as a mistake or abnormality. But it’s not easy! It takes plenty of hard work and determination to transform weaknesses to strengths – yet that’s what Going Pro is about!

Thanks to Ratchaburi Takraw Club for the use of the banner image

Written by Daniel Ellen-Barwell of Takrawesome

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – issue is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters. org/content-only/faq. php#publishers.

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