Wednesday, July 26th, 2017

Provider foot faults – the rules described!

Published on January 23, 2015 by   ·   No Comments

In contemporary sepaktakraw the serve is a potent weapon that can make or break a team’s chances of success – a powerful or even well placed serve can mean easy points, while a weak or inconsistent serve can leach points to the other team. Given the importance of the particular serve, it’s equally important that the rules regarding serving are clear, constant, and make for good game play.

Recently there has been a lot of dilemma around what constitutes a foot problem and what constitutes a fair service. We were privy to a technical meeting in Thailand earlier last year where the regulating body of international sepaktakraw competitors, ISTAF, clarified the rule intended for team managers and coaches, and explained how the rule should be applied by referees. The rule says that a foul occurs if:

“During the execution from the service, the Tekong’s non-kicking foot is lifted off the floor prior to the kicking foot’s contact with the basketball, or the non-kicking foot steps completely out of the Service Circle”
– Rule 11. 1 . 13, ISTAF Law of the Game, 2013.

So , there are two sorts of foot fault –

  1. the first is where the server’s foot lifts off the ground before they kick the ball, and
  2. the second is where the server’s foot arrives completely outside the circle.

Let’s break it down so we can understand the rule much better.

The lifted foot – Divided, the rule states that from the moment the inside player makes the service toss, the server cannot lift their particular non-kicking, or planted foot, completely off the ground. Shuffling, sliding, or pivoting to the planted foot is fine. Likewise, lifting part of the foot, or propping on your toes is fine, so long as the entire foot doesn’t come completely off the ground. Once the ball has been kicked, your foot can come off the ground.

The foot outside the group – To understand exactly how this one works, you have to look meticulously at the wording of the rule; “…or the non-kicking foot steps completely out of the service circle. ” What this means is that this planted foot can in fact touch the line of the service circle. Heck, you can actually have your foot partially outside the circle , so long as part of your foot remains within the circle. Sounds weird, right? Yet that’s exactly the clarification we received from ISTAF at the 2014 King’s Cup in Thailand – this is how ISTAF wants the game to be played.

Have a look at this image that shows you examples of what is allowed and what is considered a foul. (Click to enlarge! )

1) Lawful – Foot inside the circle
2) Legal – Perhaps the the majority of confusing. You may think that because the server has touched the line it is a bad, BUT because part of his foot is still touching the inside of the group, it is legal
3) Bad – Same server as #2, but notice that this time no a part of his foot is touching the ground inside the circle, therefore it is a bad
4) Foul – This particular shows a hop/jump just before getting in touch with the ball. Even if this server’s left foot touches the ground once again before he kicks the basketball, it is a foul

On the 2014 King’s Cup, referees were coming down hard on servers intended for either taking a step or jumping before striking the ball, presumably because ISTAF told them to. Fast forward to the ISTAF SuperSeries Myanmar that was recently held and we did not see many foot faults until the final, where both Nattapong Kraiwan and Rattadech Noijaroen of Thailand were called for sliding outside the group during the service (which, replays and photos show were excellent calls by the referee). I was glued to my live stream in the early models of ISS Myanmar and, exactly like at King’s Cup, it was fairly easy to spot a few servers would you always step with their non-kicking foot before striking the ball, yet were never fouled for it.

Whether you agree with the particular rule or not, I hope you’ll are in agreement with me that the most important thing is the fact that referees administer the rule consistently in all competitions. Fouling foot errors at one competition and not from another makes it difficult for players to know what they can and can not do, and a sport without apparent rules is in trouble if it really wants to be taken seriously by an international target audience, especially with the goal of becoming a good Olympic sport

Perhaps the issue can be rectified with a re-think of how referees judge the services. Currently, the chair referee is in charge of calling foot faults, but the issue is that the chair referees elevated perspective makes it very difficult to consistently see whether a server’s foot has left the ground in the case of a hop or phase. But what if we let the line referee on the server’s side make the call? The line referee is at ground level and so can much more consistently judge in case a foot has left the ground or still left the circle. The other aspect is consistency between referees – we require all sepaktakraw referees to be on a single page, and currently I’m unsure they are.

Maybe the particular rule needs a rethink. Maybe the way in which our referees judge service errors needs to change. I don’t have the answer, but maybe you do. As an international community of sepaktakraw players and fans, surely we can put our heads together, throw some ideas around, and figure out the way forward. So , so what do you think?

By Alex Newman of Takrawesome

3/11/14

Suggested article: Chomsky: Many people are – Fill in the Blank .
This entry passed through the particular Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading through it on someone else’s site, make sure you read the FAQ at fivefilters. org/content-only/faq. php#publishers.

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In modern sepaktakraw the particular serve is a potent weapon that can make or break a team’s chances of success – a powerful or well placed function can mean easy points, while a weak or inconsistent serve may leach points to the other team. Given the importance of the serve, it is equally important that the rules regarding serving are clear, consistent, and lead to good game play.

Lately there has been a lot of confusion around exactly what constitutes a foot fault and what constitutes a fair service. We were privy to a technical meeting in Thailand previously last year where the governing body associated with international sepaktakraw competition, ISTAF, cleared up the rule for team supervisors and coaches, and explained the way the rule should be applied by referees. The rule states that a bad occurs if:

“During the execution of the service, the particular Tekong’s non-kicking foot is lifted off the floor prior to the kicking foot’s contact with the ball, or the non-kicking foot steps completely out of the Provider Circle”
– Rule eleven. 1 . 13, ISTAF Law from the Game, 2013.

So , there are two types of foot problem –

  1. the first is where the server’s foot lifts off the ground before they kick the basketball, and
  2. the second is in which the server’s foot comes completely outside of the circle.

Let us break it down so we may understand the rule better.

The lifted foot – Broken down, the principle states that from the moment the inside participant makes the service throw, the server cannot lift their non-kicking, or even planted foot, completely off the ground. Shuffling, slipping, or pivoting on the planted foot is fine. Likewise, lifting part of the foot, or propping up on your toes is fine, so long as the whole foot does not come completely off the ground. Once the basketball has been kicked, your foot may come off the ground.

The particular foot outside the circle – To understand how this one functions, you have to look carefully at the wording of the rule; “…or the non-kicking foot steps completely out of the service group. ” What this means is that the planted foot can in fact touch the line of the services circle. Heck, you can actually have your foot partially outside of the circle , so long as part of your foot remains inside the circle. Seems weird, right? But that’s precisely the clarification we received from ISTAF at the 2014 King’s Cup in Thailand – this is how ISTAF wants the game to be played.

Have a look at this image that teaches you examples of what is allowed and what is considered a foul. (Click to enlarge! )

1) Legal – Feet inside the circle
2) Lawful – Perhaps the most confusing. You might think that because the server has handled the line it is a foul, BUT since part of his foot is still coming in contact with the inside of the circle, it is lawful
3) Foul – Same server as #2, but observe that this time no part of his foot is touching the ground inside the group, therefore it is a foul
4) Foul – This shows a hop/jump just before contacting the basketball. Even if this server’s left foot touches the ground again before this individual kicks the ball, it is a bad

At the 2014 King’s Cup, referees were coming down difficult on servers for either having a step or hopping before stunning the ball, presumably because ISTAF told them to. Fast forward to the ISTAF SuperSeries Myanmar that was recently held and we didn’t see a lot of foot faults until the final, where both Nattapong Kraiwan and Rattadech Noijaroen of Thailand were required sliding outside the circle during the services (which, replays and photos show were excellent calls by the referee). I was glued to my live stream in the early rounds of ISS Myanmar and, just like at King’s Cup, it was pretty easy to place a few servers who would always phase with their non-kicking foot before stunning the ball, but were by no means fouled for it.

Whether you agree with the rule or not, I hope you’ll agree with me that this most important thing is that referees administrate the rule consistently in all contests. Fouling foot faults at 1 competition and not at another makes it difficult for players to know what they can and can’t do, along with a sport without clear rules is in trouble if it wants to be taken seriously by an international audience, especially using the goal of becoming an Olympic sport

Perhaps the issue could be rectified with a rethink of how referees judge the service. Currently, the particular chair referee is responsible for calling foot faults, but the problem is that the seat referees elevated perspective makes it very hard to consistently determine if a server’s foot has left the ground in the case of a hop or step. But what if we let the collection referee on the server’s side associated with call? The line referee is at ground level and so can much more consistently judge if a foot leaves the ground or left the group. The other aspect is consistency in between referees – we need all sepaktakraw referees to be on the same page, and currently I’m not sure they are.

Maybe the rule requires a rethink. Maybe the way our referees judge service faults needs to alter. I don’t have the answer, but maybe you are doing. As an international community of sepaktakraw players and fans, surely we are able to put our heads together, toss some ideas around, and figure out the way in which forward. So , what do you think?

By Alex Newman of Takrawesome

3/11/14

Recommended article: Chomsky: We Are All – Fill in the Blank .
This particular entry passed through the Full-Text REALLY SIMPLY SYNDICATION service – if this is your articles and you’re reading it upon someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters. org/content-only/faq. php#publishers.

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